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   Health > New Medication > Dilantin is a medici
Disabledinfo
 
 
Dilantin is a medicine used to prevent seizures

Dilantin contains Phenytoin; associated to the group of medicines known as anti-epileptics. Phenytoin is used to handle and avoid certain kinds of convulsions, as well as to avoid and cure convulsions that happen during or following neurosurgery. It performs on the mind to decrease the number and harshness of convulsions.

Dosage:

The suggested amount of phenytoin differs according to individual needs. The suggested beginning amount for grownups is 100 mg taken 3 times a day. Your physician will then modify the amount depending on how well it works and is accepted. The regular amount is 300 mg to 400 mg everyday taken orally area in divided dose or a single dose. An increase to 600 mg taken in divided amounts may be required in some situations.

The kid's amount is depending on age and bodyweight. The suggested beginning amount is 5 mg per kg of bodyweight per day, which is then separated into 3 equivalent amounts.

The level of phenytoin in your blood test can be examined through lab examining. This analyse allows your physician figure out the amount of phenytoin that best you prefer. Phenytoin may be taken with or after foods. Do not use capsule that are discoloured.

Side effects:

* Contact your physician if you experience these adverse reactions and they are serious or annoying. Your doctor may be able to advise you on managing adverse reactions.
* Constipation, dizziness (mild)
* Drowsiness (mild)
* Although most of these adverse reactions listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious issues if you do not examine with your physician or seek medical care.

Check with your physician as soon as possible if any of the following adverse reactions occur:

* Bone pain or fractures
* Bleeding, soft, or increased gums
* Changes in muscle motions or coordination
* Confusion, difficulty sleeping
* Dizziness, headache
* Nausea, rash
* Sensation of spinning
* Signs of bleeding (e.g., uncommon nosebleeds, discoloration, blood in urine, coughing blood, bleeding gums, cuts that don't stop bleeding)
* Signs of infection (symptoms may include chills or high temperature, serious diarrhoea, difficulty breathing, extended faintness, frustration, firm neck, weight-loss, or listlessness)
* Signs of liver issues (e.g., nausea or throwing up, throwing up, diarrhoea, appetite reduction, weight-loss, soiling of the skin or whites of the eyes, dark urine, light stools)
* Slurred speech
* Symptoms of high glucose levels (e.g., frequent urinating, increased hunger, excessive eating, mysterious weight-loss, poor injure healing, infections, spicy breathing odour)
* Unusual eye movement
* Vomiting

Storage: Store at room temperature. Protect from heat, light and moisture. Keep away from reach of children.
 
Richard MacLeod
 
 
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